How to Make a Cookie Embosser Stamp for Fondant

How to Make a Cookie Embosser Stamp for Fondant main article image
Posted on September 27, 2021 by Carrie Christenson
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Hello fellow cookie lovers!  If you are anything like me and follow tons of amazing bakers on Instagram I’m sure you’ve seen people making gorgeous-looking sugar cookies topped with stamped fondant, it seems to be most widely done in Australia.

I looked into buying some of those cookie stamps and they are not cheap!  It’s roughly $20 per stamp and then there’s the shipping and taxes and I don’t know about you but I really don’t have the budget for that as a home baker who makes cookies mostly for my kids.  I figured there must be a way to create my own stamp using my handy craft arsenal.

I bet you know where this is going….I have figured it out using items you can buy from your local craft or even the dollar store. Now you can make your own seasonal stamps to impress your family without breaking the bank.

The Supplies Needed:

Create Your Cookie Stamps

I’m making Halloween cookie stamps since it’s quickly approaching but you can make any design you want. 

I found this Halloween bundle and I’m using several designs from it to make my stamps.  You’ll want to download the files and make sure they’ve been unzipped.

Open your Cricut Design Space and upload the files.  Here’s a step-by-step guide in case you’re new to this!

Step 1: Upload the Design

In the bottom left-hand corner you’ll see the Upload tool, click on that to get this screen and then click on the “Upload Image” button for the Image option.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 1

Step 2: Browse for the File

Find where you saved the SVG file you want to use and open it to be uploaded.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 2

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 3

Step 3: Prepare to Upload

Now that you’ve selected your file, the system will ask you about what you want to upload.  The file I’m using is very clear that it’s a cut file, but if you have more of an image with several colors it will ask you if it’s a “print then cut” design”.  Select Upload in the lower right corner.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 4

Step 4: Select Your Image

You’ll see all of the various images you’ve uploaded into the system now, select the design you want to cut, and click “Insert Images”

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 5

Step 5: Resize the Design

Most likely it will upload as a large-sized image.  You can type the size you want the design to be in the top bar or simply drag the image smaller by clicking a corner and shrinking it down.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 6

Step 6: Continue Adding Designs

I figured I would cut a few at once so I added more designs to the canvas.  The spider web lines I feared would be too thin to cut well so I tried the newest feature of the design space software and offset the design. 

You’ll click on the toolbar at the top and then can type in the distance you want it to offset to.  I just wanted it a little bit thicker but I didn’t want to lose the overall look of the original design.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 7

(Optional steps if you offset like me)

Now you’ll see the thicker design, but it’s layered with the original size (you can see it broken down on the right layer panel).   We don’t want the original design anymore.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 8

Select the original design and drag it to the side and then delete it.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 9

Step 7: Finish Adding Design

Once you have all of your designs added you’re ready to cut.  Side note: Cricut sorts cuts by color automatically, so make sure it’s all the same color by clicking on the design and then clicking the color in the top left corner.  I forgot to screenshot that step.  Click the green “Make It” button in the top right.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 10

Step 8: Arrange the Cutting Mat

I wish we could customize the size of the material you’re cutting on but that’s not an option with Cricut.  Find the material size closest to yours so you can arrange the designs to be spaced apart when you cut them.  You’re going to want a little bit of space around them for creating your stamps.  I wish I had left more space in hindsight for mine shown here.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 11

Step 9: Set Up the Cut Settings

Find the craft foam option in the materials list and select that as your material.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 12

Now it will ask you about the cutting tool you’re using.  I tried both but found that the knife blade cut a lot better so I selected that tool.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 13

Cricut Maker and Knife blade photo

Step 10: Cut the Designs

Now load your cutting mat with the craft foam attached into your Cricut Maker and push the flashing button to start cutting.

Cricut screen shot for Cookie Stamps 14

Craft Foam in Cricut Maker Machine

Step 11: Remove the Foam

Once your machine has finished cutting the shapes out, the best way to remove the foam from the cutting mat is to lay the foam side down on the table and then slowly peel the mat away from the foam.  This is a handy trick for almost every material so it doesn’t curl up on you.

Removing Foam from Cutting Mat

Step 12: Weed the Designs

I just used my scissors to separate all of the various designs out from the one single foam sheet.

If you want the design to emboss (pop out) from the fondant, weed out the shapes you cut.  You can see I weeded most of my designs that way.

If you want the design to debs (sink in) then weed the “white space” material around the design as I did for the spider shown here.

Photos of Weeded Foam Designs

Step 13: Attach Foam to Plexiglass

This is why you wanted the sticker back foam! Simply peel the foam off the backer and onto cut-down plexiglass to fit your design.  Scissors are the easiest way to cut the plexiglass too.

Photo of Spider foam on plexiglass

If you have a design with unattached elements like the spider web, you’ll treat it as a vinyl design and add some transfer tape on top so you can easily shift the full design onto the plexiglass all at once.

photo of transfer tape on foam web

Photo of Web Stamp

Let’s Stamp Fondant!

Photo of supplies for fondant stamps

Step 1:  Roll Out Your Fondant

I have a fondant roller that came with bands to keep the thickness consistent (highly recommended!!) and chose to do the middle depth bands (mine has 3 options).  You don’t want to bite into thick fondant, but you need some depth to get a crisp design.

Photo of rolling fondant

Step 2: Stamp the Fondant

Carefully position your stamp into the center of the fondant and then use your hand to press or use your roller to push the stamp into the fondant.

photo of stamping fondant

Step 3: Remove the Stamp

Now gently grab a corner of the plexiglass and slowly peel it away from the fondant.

Photo of stamped fondant-pumpkin face

Step 4: Cut the Shape

Now you’ll need the cookie cutter you used for your cookies.  Line up the cutter over your stamped image and cut the fondant out.

Photo of cookie cutter on fondant

photo of cut out stamped fondant-pumpkin

Step 5: Color the Fondant (if desired)

I wanted the designs to pop so I used my edible ink markers and colored the embossed designs.  (You can also do this step after the fondant is attached to the cookie)

Photo of coloring fondant

You can also use luster dust with a brush, I did that with my black fondant and spider web designs to have a softer look.

photo of brushing luster dust on fondant

Step 6: Attach the Fondant

I’ve seen people use water or this edible glue to attach their fondant to the sugar cookie.  Since my sugar cookies are a churro flavor with cinnamon and sugar on top I decided to use the edible glue to have better adhesion. 

photo of edible glue

Step 7:  Enjoy Your Hard Work!!

Admire your beautiful cookies!!  What I love about this technique is you don’t need to have amazing royal icing skills to create professional-looking cookies.  It also saves lots of time by not needing the royal icing to dry between steps to create a layered look.

photos of halloween cookies

closer photo of halloween fondant cookies

I will admit I was skeptical about how the fondant would taste and it honestly tastes the same as if it would if you had used royal icing.  It adds just a touch of sweetness on top but still has a nice soft bite.

My only note about making cookie stamps out of the craft foam is that it’s best to use simple shapes and clean fonts for the best results.  I tried making more involved designs and they wouldn’t cut cleanly.  I think you would need a laser cutting machine with plexiglass to make complicated designs like the ones you can buy for $20+ per stamp.  

Happy craft baking everyone!!  Please tag me if you make any yourself using this technique  I’m @designedtobecrafty on Instagram.

-Carrie Christenson


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